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Google Invests €4 Billion In Europe’s Data Centers and Renewable Energy Projects

Google Invests €4 Billion In Europe’s Data Centers and Renewable Energy Projects
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Google is currently planning to invest €3 billion to expand data centers across Europe in the next two years. This is according to Sundar Pichai, the CEO of Google. In this way, Google will bring its total investment in Europe’s internet infrastructure to €15 billion since 2007.

Google To Invest In Europe

The €3 billion investment is going to improve the economic activity in the region, and support more than 13,000 full-time jobs in the European Union (EU) every year.

The announcement was made on September 20, by Sundar Pichai, the CEO of Google that is currently in Finland and will meet with the country’s Prime Minister Antti Rinne to discuss his priorities for the EU Presidency.

At the same time, they are planning to invest, another 600 million euros in 2020 to expand their data centre presence in Hamina, Finland. In this way, they will be bringing their total investment to €2 billion euros since 2009. In the country, they will support 4,300 jobs per year, on average in the next two years.

According to Mr. Pichai, this is a significant driver of economic growth and opportunity for Finland and the region.

Boosting Renewable Energy Infrastructure in the EU

It is worth pointing out that they are also going to construct €1 billion euros in renewable energy infrastructure in the European Union. These investments will range from a new offshore wind project in Belgium to five solar energy projects in Denmark. Moreover, two new wind energy projects will be created in Sweden as well.

Meanwhile, in Finland, they will also invest in two wind energy projects that will more than double their renewable energy capacity in the country. This will allow Google’s data centres in the country to match all of the electricity consumption at their Finnish data center with local carbon-free sources. Pichai commented about it:

“If infrastructure is the backbone of a strong digital economy, people are at its heart. The second way we can help Europe harness its opportunities is through investments to reskill the workforce for the new digital economy.”

At the same time, the CEO of Google explains the Nordics have already shown strong leadership in the new digital economy. Finland is currently educating 1 percent of the population using artificial intelligence. Google has also been investing in education by providing people around the world with digital skill allowing them to find a job and grow their business.

Google has also opened skills hub called Digital Garage in Helsinki. Pichai will be able to meet with several students in the country that are already attending different courses there.

If all these investments were not enough, Google.org, their philanthropy arm will make a grant worth $2 million to Nesta, a foundation that focuses on innovation. In this way, the organization will make training partnerships with different trade unions in different European countries.

Google (NASDAQ: GOOGL) shares are currently priced at $1,229.84.

With the investment in renewable energies in Europe and its expansion of data centres in the continent, Google is investing €4 billion and increasing its presence in the European Union.

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Justinas Baltrusaitis

Justin is an editor, writer, and a downhill fan. He spent many years writing about finances, blockchain, and crypto-related news. He strives to serve the untold stories for the readers.

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